Monday, November 16, 2009

Guerrilla Conditioning - Guerrilla Camping 101.4

Guerrilla Conditioning - Guerrilla Camping 101.4

Sun, 30 Oct 2005 05:47:47 -0600
R93332
4 years ago
disgruntled

Dude, your post makes me want to get out of my office job and go hiking for a few months SO BADLY. SHIT. SHIT SHIT SHIT.

I’m ready: running, boxing, yoga, and weight-lifting keep me in shape. But the morning routine of break-down, the all day exertion of walking/jogging, the hanging from oak limbs, etc. Man it all sounds SO GOOD.

Post Modified: 10/30/05 05:51:11

R93335
4 years ago
silverback

you need to put all this stuff into a book, a manual of sorts. it would be a great buy for the guerrilla set, whether they are getting ready for Armageddon, the collapse of Western society, a revolution or just to get in shape.


R93348
4 years ago
ShiftShapers

yes, stretching is crucial.

very true about exercise being and effective warm-up. i’ve always said that those who heat themselves with wood are lucky, because it warms them three times. once when they collect it, once when they chop it, and then again when they burn it. wood chopping is excellent exercise. just be sure to keep good posture and lift with your legs, not your back.

i think trek poles are rediculous, but that’s just my opinion.

good post my friend, as always. keep up the good work. let’s go tackle a fourteener sometime. i live in the midst of many.


R93353
4 years ago
ShiftShapers

R93368
4 years ago
Snark

The bent-leg slow quasi-run gait you describe perfectly describes how I’ve seen the hill people of Nepal walk. They never lock a knee or come down stiffly; their legs are nearly always bent, their steps very short, and they seem to glide smoothly more than stomp. Westerners tend to take big long strides, lunging from each step, and when heading downhill tend to keep their legs straight, jacking their foot hard into the ground and taking the shock straightlegged, not absorbing it by flexing the knees. It takes just an unbelievable amount of leg strength, but I’ve hiked many miles this way, and it’s just vastly more efficient and comfortable. It’s also easier to maintain good footing, and you remain more stable with a heavy load. Considering that the Nepalis regularly carry 90-120lb loads over rough trails that can gain a thousand meters in just a couple of kilometers, it’s unsurprising that they’ve developed such a perfect hiking style.

Also, shifty- I’m in the Denver area, but I’ll PM you if I’m ever in your neck of the woods. I’d definitely like to claim a 14er in the name of GNN....


R93381
4 years ago
BlackPacker

Shiftshaper, You got me prompted to do a new GC on fire building with that remark. Yes, building a fire is a definate warm up. And I also think trek poles are ridiculous, but I want to try them just so I can say that I know they are ridiculous.

Digruntled. Do it. It’s surprisingly easy to get out for a day a week and I can’t tell you how much perspective it gives you on everything that happens back “in society”.

Anthony. A book would be great, and if enough gorillas bought it, I suppose I could stop spending so much time working in cafes and diners. I’d still want it to be free though. So, know any publishers?


R93382
4 years ago
BlackPacker

Oh yeah, and a 14er sounds great. If things keep going as I plan, I should be in Colorado spring of 2007. If Anthony provides a flag, let’s plant one on Mt. Elbert.


R93402
4 years ago
OriginalG

It appears that your GC blog info is being posted by other people at other sites. Maybe claiming that they’re the ones who’re the original writers. Maybe it’s you, posting your info under alias’ at different site’s. In any case, I saw this on a website called Libertythink, and they posted their link to the GC 101.1 as having originated at sianews.com, which is where the following link will take you. Just thought you may be interested in knowing.

http://sianews.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=2716

.........

- Ø®£Z –


R93404
4 years ago
OriginalG

P.s. Silverback is Stephen, not Anthony ;)


R93409
4 years ago
ShiftShapers

i also recommend these Wilderness Manuals.


R93410
4 years ago
ShiftShapers

yeah, only THAT posting of GC 101.1 had a few little extras, including firearms:

Communications: Remember, that every US-made cell phone manufactured after 2002, by Federal law, contains a GPS monitoring device; and probably do most late-model foreign brands. They know where you are. If you have to be in contact, probably best to freshen up and walk down to a streetside pay phone. If you forsee that that is not going to be possible: buy a prepaid cheapie, use it only if your life or situation depends on it, turn it off (and remove the battery, if it’s a removable-battery model) when you’re not on it, and destroy it when you no longer need it.

Your Friend: Everyone has a different preference as to firearms. You’re sleeping and walking alone, so you will want to carry one. This little essay is not about the hunting expedition – you’re just moving from place to place—, so carry a fairly disposable old standby, a dozen rounds should be plenty, and use your best discretion.

if you are not the one posting this stuff on that site, Blackpacker, you might want to do something about it.


R93416
4 years ago
MaxBooze

I was wondering, and looking forward to another one of your “Guerrilla Camping” posts…


R93423
4 years ago
silverback

BP

There is an agent I can try to hook you up with. The key will be to get the whole ‘book’ figured out and then completed. At this point, you could probably do another 5 chapters so that there are 10 in total, go over them to make sure everything is there that you want and then we can see if the agent will take it on. If not, I know a small publisher who might be interested. Only problem is that they pay very little in an advance…

You can send me a message if you want to discuss more.


R93453
4 years ago
BlackPacker

I was thinking 10 chapters myself. I’ll send you a message about it once I get closer to 9. Also, I went back and edited the food section to include a bit of bear bagging info, and am planning on doing the same to GC 1 and 2.

Thanks for the heads up on the SIA reposting, OG. I went in there and posted, and they fixed the header. Unfortunately, I was at a friends house during a halloween party and spelled my name PlackPacker, so now they probably think I’ve got bad teeth.


R93689
4 years ago
hagcel

BP, you should also mention the importance of stretching while hiking. As you walk, you calf muscles, due to all that stress will tighten over the course of a day. I always strecth my calves every thirty minutes to avoid muscle tears,


R93749
4 years ago
guerillaman

Rooftops. In the city look for rooftops that are low enough to scramble up on from a dumpster or a fire escape. Garage rooftops, unused buildings’ rooftops, commercial outbuildings all work but consider how you will get down unnoticed in the morning. I use a blue tarp to cover with in the city. People see them everywhere and are unconcerned to see one on a rooftop. Be safe. Be awake. Be the change.


R94278
4 years ago
nada

2 words: Mole Skin


R94452
4 years ago
BlackPacker

Moleskin is first aid.

Guerilla man, It’s funny you mention that about tarps, I was writing the camoflage blog when you posted that. Green tarps are just as common, and less obvious in the woods. Rooftops though are great. I should include a section in campsite selction when I revise it.

Hagcel, stretching while hiking is definatly important. I don’t stop to stretch usually, though. Instead I take a few minutes to walk slowly doing calf stretches as I go. They definately let me know when they need it.

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